Tuesday, June 1, 2010

Emer Gillespie




The Photographers' Gallery in London is currently showing a selection of student work by recent graduates of English art schools. Among the 27 entries, this one in particular caught my eye (and my heart).

"Two Homes" by Emer Gillespie documents the parallels of the two separate households in which the artist’s child lives. In a rare example of the diptych form being used to its best advantage (a form much abused by student photographers) Gillespie pairs scenes of seemingly mundane objects and routines that make up the life of a child living with separated parents.

While on one hand, the images illustrate subtle connotations of gender distinction - what's most affecting is the straightforward observation of what must be undoubtedly confusing for a young child.











8 comments:

Jordana said...

phenomenal!

Rebecca said...

Fascinating pictures in their clear-eyed scrutiny of a very common situation, and really affecting. One feels greater sadness for the parents, who appear so unhappy in a situation no one would choose, than for the daughter, whose needs seem to be met in both households. The identical meal diptych provides welcome humour.

Jennifer said...

After seeing the first diptych, before reading the project description, I was ready to not like the series. I was very wrong. This is a simple presentation of a very complex situation. Incredible.

Don said...

How terribly sad for the child. I feel a great deal of sadness when I look at these pictures. Makes me want to hug my children and their mother even more.

The Concrete Commentator said...

wonderful concept. His work is beautiful and fascinating. I would love to see some larger images in person.

The Photodiarist said...

When I saw the first diptych, I, like Jennifer above, thought it might be a bit boring. But then as I went on, I was deeply impacted. How subtle but intense!

pianosa said...

as a child who grew up with divorced parents, these pictures are rather familiar in a sentimental, nostalgic way. however, i would like to present an alternative to the "confusion" you cited, and the sadness felt by Don, above... for me, things were just one way in one house and another way in the other. i was happy both places; both were home. :)

nina said...

as always - thank you for sharing!