Wednesday, March 23, 2011

Shot


Photograph by Robert Beck/SI


The above photograph of Brigham Young University's Jimmer Fredette graces the cover of this week's Sports Illustrated and is justly being hailed an instant classic. Taken by SI's Robert Beck during BYU's third-round win over Gonzaga, it captures the 6' 2" leading collegiate scorer as he soars to make a three-pointer.

It has it all! The impossible height Fredette seems to achieve, the domination of the Gonzaga defender, the dramatic light that echoes the ball as it prepares to make its way to the hoop. The greatest sports photographs are always works of art.




11 comments:

Jay.CA said...

beautiful!

the SI cover ruined it with too much text though. :(

Bill Randall said...

Thanks for posting the photo sans text-- as printed SI's logo blots out the light from above, obscuring that Jimmer plays for the Angel Moroni's favorite team. And the square composition works so well...

Pierre said...

and the poor Gonzaga defender looks like being stroke down by the flare.

Joe Holmes said...

Brilliant! Also brilliant is the way the image leaves the perfect amount of space for titles. I can't prove it, but I swear the best sports shooters instinctively know how to frame for the magazines.

Davidikus said...

Of course I may be wrong (as always) but doesn't the topic matter? As much as I love photography for photography sake (& I do as my blog testifies: I take pictures of lamp posts & trash!), I think that for a photograph to become a classic, it most likely has to show a classic moment. In other words: can a collegiate basketball photograph become a classic? Unless one or more of the people on the photography become extremely famous, probably not...
A less interesting shot of a (soccer) FIFA World Cup final is more likely to become a classic.

I do like the picture though, especially the fact that with all these circles of light would be considered as 'imperfection' or 'unprofessional' by many editors and the picture would typically be WRONGLY discarded.

http://davidikus.blogspot.com/
http://www.davidranc.com

TK said...

Robert Beck has captured another one of those "classic" sports photos. Everything works perfectly in the photo. I think it is a classic moment in basketball. But if you want a classic soccer photo, he shot that too. Remember the photo of Brandi Chastain after she took her top off in woman's soccer back in 1999. Another Beck classic.
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/soccer/world/1999/womens_worldcup/news/1999/07/23/out_of_this_world/coverlarge.html

gphoto said...

Jimmer is an amazing player.

Anonymous said...

You don't have to be a Gursky or Struth to shoot a "classic". Every genre of photography has its conventions...those photographers who transcend those conventions in a particular photo can well claim to have shot a "classic". You don't have to have famous people in your shot to make it a classic. This photo goes well beyond your typical newspaper sports photo...Neil Leifer was a master in this genre and this photo can stand shoulder to shoulder with the best of Neil's work.

frank_ezelle said...

Interesting post about a photo that strikes me as rather weak for Sports Illustrated. While the wide angle lens from a low level might be an unusual look, it is clear from the left foot that this is an average height jump shot (feet about as high as a defender's knees). Also clear is that it is an uncontested shot since the defender is so far away that he doesn't go up to defend, but is already turning to rebound.

A wide open jump shot of average height that features the player's rear end rather than his face--I just don't see the greatness of this sports photo.

Amanda Leah said...

absolutely agreed--the cover takes so much away from the photo with its block text! a beautiful shot nonetheless, really appreciate the picture posted sans typeface, thank you!

kingsOfTheWildFrontier said...

There is definitely a whole narrative captured in this shot- it is not just about one player, it is about the entire moment.
Even more than the height he achieves, I am struck by the perspective regarding the distance from the basket. I'd give him 4 points.